Episode 6 | Democracy | TBN

Episode 6 | Democracy

Watch Episode 6 | Democracy
October 9, 2018
26:34

Jesus the Game Changer

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Episode 6 | Democracy

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  • (music)
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  • We're here in the center of London.
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  • And this is the British
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  • Houses of Parliament and the iconic Big Ben behind us.
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  • it's like a symbol of democracy right around the world.
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  • Over this shoulder is actually Westminster Abbey.
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  • From the Church of England, here in England.
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  • It's a symbol of Christianity and Faith.
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  • It's interesting that they're both
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  • separated by a road.
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  • Because this is what modern democracy's hold to.
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  • The idea that state and church should be separate identities.
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  • There's been lots of times in history when they've been fused together in really unhelpful ways.
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  • Monarchies have been supported by the church, church by monarchies.
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  • - power over all of the people.
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  • Some people have deduced from that, that somehow the Christian faith,
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  • especially in religion,
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  • is actually negative for democarcy.
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  • But that's not really the case.
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  • What Jesus taught - the values and principles that Jesus taught
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  • are the foundations for
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  • for robust democracies.
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  • That individuals are all of equal worth. The rule of law
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  • - the rule of conscious - are all things that Jesus taught.
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  • And are all that give democracies their ability to exist and to function.
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  • The church and the teaching of Jesus doesn't stand against democracy.
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  • It actually gives the foundation on which democracy exists.
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  • - When you use the word democracy, that's a Greek word.
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  • It just means rule of Demos - the people.
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  • And it was what
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  • they had in ancient Athens and the time of Plato and socrates and Aristotle,
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  • but what they had wasn't what we would recognize as a democracy.
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  • I mean, for one thing there was,
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  • there was no sort of, um,
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  • republic type a institution. They weren't MP's.
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  • The way the ancient Athenian democracy worked was everyone just came to the,
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  • to the market place in the central town and voted - it was basically government by
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  • referendum. You know,
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  • everything that happens. Everyone,
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  • all the voters just turned up and just stuck their hands up.
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  • And they could do that because, well,
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  • partly because it was just one city, but partly because not many people
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  • actually had to vote.
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  • Like, it was about one sixth of people. So you had to be male,
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  • actually had the vote, you know,
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  • you know, women didn't have the vote.
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  • Foreigners didn't, slaves didn't,
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  • you know, it was,
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  • um, it was pretty aristocratic rule of the Aristos.
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  • The best is what that literally means, but,
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  • aristocracy.
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  • you know, we'll live them the ability.
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  • So no, there was certainly no concepts of
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  • equality. Plato in his writings has a very elitist
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  • sort of politics. Um,
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  • you know, some today would regarding well Mr
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  • Fascist, that was partly because he mistrusted
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  • democracy because it was the democracy that had killed his beloved socrates.
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  • Aristotle notoriously believed in natural slaves and things like that.
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  • So, um,
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  • so no, the idea of,
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  • of the everyone is equal, I mean that's a very modern idea,
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  • you know, and it comes from many different sources, and one of them is Christianity.
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  • And so Tocqueville's a Frenchman comes to the United States in 1830,
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  • sources, one of which is Christianity.
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  • stays here between 18 months and two years just goes all around the country
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  • studying democracy. And the assumption of the European elite
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  • was United States would fail, democracy would fail and that they
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  • wanted to build alliances with us so that when democracy fail,
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  • they could swoop in and take over what the British had.
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  • Tocqueville went back and said, no,
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  • democracy is not failing in America. Quite to the contrary,
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  • democracy is the wave of the future. And if we want to get it right when it
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  • comes to Europe, we need to learn from their example.
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  • So and, but Tocqueville discovered was not only
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  • his morality matter but religion matter.
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  • - So why did religion matter?
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  • Tocqueville looked at America and
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  • said what, what is going to keep us from pursuing
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  • our own individual self interest? He believed that people were no question
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  • where self interested, but for democracy to work,
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  • we had to get outside of ourselves. We had to get to know our neighbors and
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  • we had to work together with our neighbors to make a good community.
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  • And Tocqueville said that Christianity was the
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  • faith that got us out of ourselves.
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  • (soft music)
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  • - What does a society need for a robust democracy to work?
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  • - Oh Man. Did you hear that question?
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  • Um, I've literally just finished the
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  • manuscript to a book about America. Where I talk about this issue.
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  • Democracy at its core is self government.
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  • Self government means that somehow we have
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  • the ability to govern ourselves. We don't need powerful forces in
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  • government governing us. We will do most of it ourselves.
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  • The question is how it never happened before in the history of the world,
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  • really until 1776 when the founders of the United States had this crazy idea
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  • that it might be possible to do this, not in theory,
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  • but to actually do it the way they did it.
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  • The secret answer to this conundrum, the secret answer was religion,
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  • God and faith. What Os Guinness famously calls the
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  • Golden Triangle of freedom. He said that in order to have freedom,
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  • you have to have a virtue because if we're going to govern ourselves,
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  • we have to say, I don't need more policemen and more -
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  • I won't steal because I believe it's wrong to steal.
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  • I need to be virtuous, so unbalanced.
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  • John Adams said, this constitution will work only for a
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  • moral and religious populous. It will only work if the people actually
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  • govern themselves. We can only have little government.
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  • We can only of self, government,
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  • and real democracy if the people genuinely govern themselves,
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  • so it's up to the people. If the people don't do it,
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  • game over, but virtue requires faith.
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  • It doesn't mean that everybody who's virtuous has faith but unbalanced.
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  • You have to have a reason to be virtuous and through history,
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  • most of people have said that, well,
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  • it's, it's part of my faith to be virtuous,
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  • but then faith in turn requires freedom. Now,
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  • the buzz around and around, because for faith to flourish,
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  • you need religious freedom, so religious freedom,
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  • I would say is at the heart of all of this,
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  • and by allowing religion to be utterly free,
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  • we allow the genius of the market of ideas,
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  • the free market of ideas to work so people will by themselves,
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  • express their faith. They don't feel that the power or the
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  • authority comes from without whether from the church or from the state,
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  • and so they will govern themselves. So,
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  • so that's ultimately, that's the short version of the secret
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  • of self government.
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  • - In 2008 London Times columnist Matthew Paris went back to Africa,
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  • to Malawi where he grew up as a boy. He was writing a story on Africa and
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  • what he discovered and what he wrote was a great surprise.
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  • What do you need to understand? Is that Matthew Paris is no great friend
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  • of Christianity or the church, in fact,
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  • he's an atheist, but what he wrote was it Africa needs
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  • Evangelical Christianity. The Christianity where people make a
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  • personal response to God, a spiritual transformation,
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  • so why would Paris right that? He said they need more than money.
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  • They need more than education. They need a change of heart,
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  • so they're kind of locked into group. Think into their community,
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  • into their family, and until they have a spiritual
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  • transformation, they can't break out and be individuals
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  • and act and think as individuals. It was the backbone of democracy for Africa.
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  • Evangelical Christianity has been for a
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  • long time and continues to be.
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  • - John, do you believe the teaching of Jesus and the Christian church is that influenced Western democracies?
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  • - Massively.
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  • Foundationally, you know the Chinese Academy of Social
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  • Sciences as Jonathan Sacks the House of Lords,
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  • chief rabbi of England, has pointed out,
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  • they established that In fact,
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  • Christianity really lie at the heart of the rise of Western civilization.
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  • Isn't it amazing that a communist regime in China can come to that conclusion?
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  • When in the West, we now have
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  • a lot of trite voices running around the place,
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  • really often not having a vague idea of, you know,
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  • what they're talking about, proclaiming that Christianity has been a
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  • negative force and held us back. In reality
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  • of course, the radical heart of Christianity where
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  • it crosses over into the public square realm is the extraordinary idea that
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  • every individual has worth and dignity, that the poor,
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  • the weak, the oppressed,
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  • those of a different skin color, whatever.
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  • It doesn't matter. Uh,
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  • you know, the king must respect the peasant.
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  • Just as a peasant has to respect the king.
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  • That's radical. It lies at the heart of the idea of the
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  • rule of law, of the vote.
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  • As one American put it, we're so good.
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  • We had to give ourselves a vote. Was that bad?
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  • We have to give ourselves a vote reflecting our dual,
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  • personality - created in the dignity of God,
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  • floored by our own selfishness and our own desire to do things our own way.
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  • How do we balance the two out? The western genius has been defined that
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  • in democracy and in the vote.
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  • - What do you think and country needs to have a good,
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  • positive, robust democracy?
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  • Well, I think beyond democracy,
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  • I mean, we don't want to have democracy for the
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  • sake of democracy. I think ultimately we are looking at
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  • democracy that would lead to human flourishing.
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  • And um, and I strongly believe that in order for
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  • a society or a nation to flourish and do well,
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  • democracy is one of the things that you need.
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  • And I think certainly the teachings of the biblical Worldview of gives us a
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  • foundation for that, for example,
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  • the respect and the dignity of humanity, the freedom to,
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  • to be who we are and to do good. And when I say the freedom to be who we
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  • are, it's not necessarily just to satisfy our
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  • desires, but to be able to locate a purpose and a
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  • meaning in a larger - a grander scheme of things.
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  • Um, I think you also need a,
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  • uh, the sense of optimism and hope for the
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  • things that you do. And,
  • 00:11:41.260 --> 00:11:44.070
  • and I think if I look around at the different worldviews in a marketplace of
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  • ideas, I believe that the biblical Worldview is
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  • the only one that's able to give you sufficiently the foundation and the
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  • belief with regards to reality for you to be able to flourish and do well.
  • 00:11:59.120 --> 00:12:02.250
  • - Want to go to that whole question of, of church and state and you know,
  • 00:12:08.140 --> 00:12:12.270
  • there's a lot of talk about separation of church and state and as somebody that was
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  • involved in politics, but with a faith background,
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  • what do you think that means? Separation of church and state.
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  • I think it means that the institutions
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  • I can put it that way, should be separate.
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  • You know, I don't think the church should ever have temporal power -
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  • but that's not to say that individuals from the church shouldn't have an
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  • the opportunity to participate in the public square.
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  • In fact, on absolutely 100 percent convinced that
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  • our society would have been infinitely the poorer because these are not new
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  • debates, William Wilberforce,
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  • who really headed up the greatest human rights movement of all times,
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  • was subject to people like Lord Melbourne scoffing,
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  • you know, things have come to a pretty past when
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  • religions allowed into the public debate,
  • 00:12:57.200 --> 00:13:00.060
  • well, imagine how much poorer we would have been
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  • if there hadn't been the attempt to force the British east India Company,
  • 00:13:03.160 --> 00:13:08.030
  • highly successful attempt to force them to behave in India and to start to
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  • educate people, set up schools and teach them how to run
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  • a country.
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  • An oppose evils like the burning of widows.
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  • Um, that same movement was responsible for a
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  • great deal of political reform and for education of the poor and Great Britain.
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  • And it was all put forward by people who were saying,
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  • I'm not operating out of philosophy or out of intended,
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  • you know, intellectual commitments to ideas.
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  • We're doing it out of Christian faith.
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  • - In Europe, all the universities,
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  • Christian universities, institutions of the church in,
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  • in America until the 1960's. If you were in a secular state
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  • university, you are required to go to church on
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  • Sunday. Every high school graduate until the 1960's
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  • graduating from private public school
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  • got a leather bound Bible as a gift. So education continued until 1960 in
  • 00:14:04.100 --> 00:14:09.100
  • Europe and in America based grounded in faith.
  • 00:14:12.040 --> 00:14:16.090
  • But the silly idea of separation of church and state separated truth from
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  • knowledge, virtue,
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  • and character from education. So it's no longer the role of the
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  • university in America to cultivate character and citizenship.
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  • That was a decision made in Chicago first.
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  • Under Stanley Fish,
  • 00:14:46.060 --> 00:14:47.280
  • that it's no longer the job of the university to cultivate virtue or character.
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  • The church is Holy Trinity Brompton. It's right in the center of London.
  • 00:15:00.090 --> 00:15:03.070
  • And in July 1945,
  • 00:15:03.290 --> 00:15:05.280
  • there was a memorial service here at the church.
  • 00:15:07.080 --> 00:15:07.190
  • Now that there's a memorial service at a church,
  • 00:15:08.290 --> 00:15:10.180
  • but this was a memorial service for a German.
  • 00:15:11.230 --> 00:15:13.050
  • I kept in mind that Britain had been at war with Germany now for six years or
  • 00:15:15.030 --> 00:15:18.240
  • thousands of young men lost their lives in the fields of Europe.
  • 00:15:18.240 --> 00:15:21.150
  • And what Churchill, a Dan was to galvanize the people of
  • 00:15:22.270 --> 00:15:26.150
  • England against Hitler. What he'd done is,
  • 00:15:26.150 --> 00:15:27.180
  • is fused together as it were, Nazi-ism in Germany.
  • 00:15:28.270 --> 00:15:30.270
  • So all Germans were in that same boat, and two key characters were important in
  • 00:15:32.260 --> 00:15:36.080
  • this memorial service. One was bishop George Bell - now Bell was
  • 00:15:37.270 --> 00:15:42.110
  • an Anglican bishop here in Britain, and he stood against a lot of what the
  • 00:15:44.110 --> 00:15:45.280
  • war machine was trying to do, like the carpet bombing of Dresden,
  • 00:15:47.170 --> 00:15:49.130
  • and it wasn't that he was just a pacifist thinking talk Hitler down.
  • 00:15:51.100 --> 00:15:52.170
  • It was. These were real people that were being
  • 00:15:52.170 --> 00:15:55.130
  • bombed. And the second was that George Bell had
  • 00:15:55.130 --> 00:15:58.160
  • organized a memorial service for Dietrich Bonhoeffer.
  • 00:15:58.160 --> 00:16:00.270
  • Bonhoeffer was a pastoral theologian, church leader in Germany all the way
  • 00:16:02.270 --> 00:16:06.010
  • through the war, and he sought to be God's representative
  • 00:16:06.010 --> 00:16:08.190
  • in that place. What we're going to explore in this
  • 00:16:08.190 --> 00:16:11.160
  • episode is that that was really complex. It was really harsh,
  • 00:16:11.160 --> 00:16:14.040
  • complex decisions that he had to make. But what George Bell and Dietrich Bonhoeffer
  • 00:16:16.050 --> 00:16:19.050
  • were both motivated on was the person of Jesus - the teaching of Jesus and they wanted to
  • 00:16:19.050 --> 00:16:23.130
  • represent Jesus in every choice that they made.
  • 00:16:23.130 --> 00:16:26.170
  • When Hitler's elected, almost immediately after the election
  • 00:16:33.220 --> 00:16:36.110
  • following month in 1933, the following month after Hitler becomes
  • 00:16:36.110 --> 00:16:39.280
  • chancellor, he enforces the area and clauses,
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  • which is, uh,
  • 00:16:44.040 --> 00:16:44.260
  • a piece of history that's famously known.
  • 00:16:45.020 --> 00:16:46.280
  • The clause is basically that anybody holding a position within the state
  • 00:16:47.010 --> 00:16:51.290
  • cannot be Jewish or of Jewish descent. Um,
  • 00:16:53.070 --> 00:16:57.070
  • and we might not think that that's a kind of key thing for the church,
  • 00:16:59.050 --> 00:17:01.120
  • but it becomes a very live issue for, for the German Protestant churches.
  • 00:17:03.090 --> 00:17:05.200
  • And then about a quarter of the people within the German church rejected the
  • 00:17:07.200 --> 00:17:10.250
  • idea of the German Christians of there being a Reich's Keka,
  • 00:17:12.090 --> 00:17:16.120
  • a national church and a national bishop. And they formed what was called the
  • 00:17:18.130 --> 00:17:21.120
  • confessing church. - Bonneville was part of the confessing
  • 00:17:23.020 --> 00:17:26.180
  • church wasn't he? - He was part of the confessing church.
  • 00:17:26.180 --> 00:17:28.110
  • And, and,
  • 00:17:29.010 --> 00:17:30.150
  • and if you like, we might think of him as being a bit of
  • 00:17:30.150 --> 00:17:32.160
  • a hard liner really in terms of his opposition to Hitler and his concern
  • 00:17:32.160 --> 00:17:35.070
  • that the church speaks out for the Jews.
  • 00:17:36.110 --> 00:17:37.220
  • In fact he famously stated only he who shouts for the Jews can sing the Gregorian chants.
  • 00:17:39.200 --> 00:17:42.230
  • So saying that you can only sing the songs if you're prepared to stand up for the Jews and the context of Nazi Germany.
  • 00:17:45.070 --> 00:17:47.260
  • Bonhoeffer seeks to put into practice. I think in that context,
  • 00:17:49.250 --> 00:17:53.190
  • the Gospel in whatever way that he possibly can.
  • 00:17:55.010 --> 00:17:56.290
  • One way that he does this is to be involved in an illegal seminary.
  • 00:17:58.160 --> 00:18:01.200
  • Uh, another way is to be present in Germany.
  • 00:18:02.260 --> 00:18:04.190
  • He says that he couldn't be involved in the building of Germany if he wasn't there
  • 00:18:06.200 --> 00:18:08.260
  • through its destruction and downfall. And in fact on two occasions people try
  • 00:18:10.240 --> 00:18:13.270
  • to get him out of Germany. He,
  • 00:18:15.000 --> 00:18:16.240
  • he's involved in things like operation seven,
  • 00:18:17.290 --> 00:18:19.170
  • which was an attempt or a successful attempt to smuggle 14 Jewish people
  • 00:18:21.070 --> 00:18:24.170
  • across the Swiss border where the story gets more complicated is that Bonhoeffer
  • 00:18:26.140 --> 00:18:29.070
  • is also involved in the assassination attempts on Hitler. Bonhoeffer is going
  • 00:18:29.070 --> 00:18:34.070
  • to be conscripted into the army.
  • 00:18:35.030 --> 00:18:36.170
  • That it gets to the point where being a clergyman no longer means that you
  • 00:18:38.170 --> 00:18:41.210
  • escape the draft or that you can just work as a chaplain.
  • 00:18:41.210 --> 00:18:44.080
  • And Bonhoeffer is expected to be a member of the army and his brother in
  • 00:18:46.070 --> 00:18:49.220
  • law has risen very high up in the ranks of the counter intelligence agency
  • 00:18:51.190 --> 00:18:54.280
  • within the Nazi Reich the Advher, but the Advher was actually a counter
  • 00:18:56.270 --> 00:19:00.200
  • intelligence agency that contained some of the most significant members of the
  • 00:19:02.240 --> 00:19:07.230
  • resistance to Hitler. So they were kind of double double
  • 00:19:09.060 --> 00:19:11.210
  • agents, if you like,
  • 00:19:11.210 --> 00:19:13.190
  • use that position directly to undermine the Nazi government.
  • 00:19:15.040 --> 00:19:18.150
  • Um, so he was involved in the two famous
  • 00:19:19.200 --> 00:19:21.220
  • failed attempts to assassinate Hitler in March of 1943.
  • 00:19:21.220 --> 00:19:26.190
  • He was also involved directly in getting messages to bishop Bell,
  • 00:19:28.030 --> 00:19:32.120
  • um, about what the situation and what the
  • 00:19:33.160 --> 00:19:35.270
  • response of the allied powers might be if they didn't manage to assassinate Hitler.
  • 00:19:35.270 --> 00:19:40.250
  • And the way in which surrender could be negotiated in that context.
  • 00:19:40.250 --> 00:19:45.210
  • Bell passed on the message to Winston Churchill.
  • 00:19:45.210 --> 00:19:48.090
  • In fact. So bonhoeffer is smack bang in the
  • 00:19:49.140 --> 00:19:51.110
  • center of the political machinations of the Second World War.
  • 00:19:51.110 --> 00:19:55.230
  • Bonhoeffer though doesn't sit lightly with all of this.
  • 00:19:57.050 --> 00:19:58.160
  • I mean, that's one of the really interesting things about his work. He writes
  • 00:20:00.180 --> 00:20:03.190
  • probably to my mind, his most important book, The Ethics, during
  • 00:20:03.190 --> 00:20:08.120
  • it is a and accounts of
  • 00:20:08.120 --> 00:20:08.160
  • forgiveness accounts of dealing with sin and accounts of something that he calls
  • 00:20:13.120 --> 00:20:18.030
  • vicarious action.
  • 00:20:18.260 --> 00:20:23.140
  • So he calls the church to vicariously take upon itself the guilt of the world
  • 00:20:25.120 --> 00:20:28.220
  • that actually to share in the work that Christ does might mean that like
  • 00:20:30.210 --> 00:20:34.080
  • Christ, we have to pour upon ourselves,
  • 00:20:35.100 --> 00:20:37.200
  • guilt that we might have to take the sin of the world upon ourselves.
  • 00:20:39.080 --> 00:20:42.080
  • He ends up in this tiny cell, one,
  • 00:20:44.240 --> 00:20:47.040
  • um, a bookshelf,
  • 00:20:47.280 --> 00:20:49.140
  • a chair at a bucket, it's a tiny bed,
  • 00:20:50.180 --> 00:20:53.120
  • six foot cell, and he is considered within the prison
  • 00:20:54.240 --> 00:20:58.130
  • to be a remarkable figure to, to conduct himself as an Aristocrat,
  • 00:21:00.110 --> 00:21:03.100
  • to speak to his gods with politeness and equity.
  • 00:21:04.220 --> 00:21:06.250
  • He prays for prisoners. He was then taken from there by a van
  • 00:21:08.100 --> 00:21:11.260
  • to Fossenberg concentration camp at what seems to be the direct orders of Hitler.
  • 00:21:13.270 --> 00:21:18.130
  • He and his fellow co-conspirators, were tried in a laundry
  • 00:21:20.000 --> 00:21:24.140
  • that was used as a makeshift, a courtroom by the SS.
  • 00:21:25.240 --> 00:21:29.070
  • They were court marshaled and sentenced to death,
  • 00:21:30.200 --> 00:21:32.290
  • uh, and at dawn,
  • 00:21:33.230 --> 00:21:34.150
  • the next morning, Bonhoeffer was stripped of his clothes.
  • 00:21:35.290 --> 00:21:38.230
  • He knelt to pray, he made his way up to the hangman's
  • 00:21:40.060 --> 00:21:44.190
  • noose, prayed again and announced,
  • 00:21:46.100 --> 00:21:49.120
  • this is the end for me, the beginning of life and died.
  • 00:21:50.220 --> 00:21:54.090
  • I'm sorry, I'm getting choked up talking about it
  • 00:21:58.120 --> 00:22:03.140
  • because the thought of what happens is quite remarkable really,
  • 00:22:03.140 --> 00:22:05.080
  • that here
  • 00:22:05.260 --> 00:22:07.280
  • is somebody who after in 1937 publishing a book that says that Christians have to
  • 00:22:07.280 --> 00:22:11.230
  • be obedient even to the ultimate cost when you couldn't have imagined what
  • 00:22:13.200 --> 00:22:17.040
  • would have come live that out. - So for you personally is you read all of
  • 00:22:17.040 --> 00:22:22.010
  • this as you reflect on the story and then recognize the sort of life that
  • 00:22:24.000 --> 00:22:28.220
  • most of us live in, in free,
  • 00:22:28.220 --> 00:22:30.000
  • open democracies. What does it mean?
  • 00:22:31.060 --> 00:22:32.020
  • - What it means to me is that the Christian faith stands above all else
  • 00:22:34.250 --> 00:22:39.250
  • and that the Christian story is a story which captivates the imagination of
  • 00:22:42.050 --> 00:22:47.050
  • culture to such a degree that Christians have to stand against evil and stand
  • 00:22:49.030 --> 00:22:52.250
  • and be counted.
  • 00:22:53.130 --> 00:22:54.220
  • It it, it means to me that the Christian life
  • 00:22:55.270 --> 00:22:58.280
  • isn't a life lived in abstraction. It isn't a life that's all about
  • 00:22:58.280 --> 00:23:01.210
  • precepts and the laws. It's a life about seeking to be faithful
  • 00:23:01.210 --> 00:23:06.000
  • to Jesus Christ and the real life context in which we find ourselves
  • 00:23:07.180 --> 00:23:09.280
  • regardless of the cost.
  • 00:23:09.280 --> 00:23:11.020
  • - In America in particular, in the West in particular,
  • 00:23:12.150 --> 00:23:14.100
  • we have gotten so used to the idea of freedom and democracy and economic
  • 00:23:16.090 --> 00:23:19.190
  • prosperity. We take it for granted.
  • 00:23:21.000 --> 00:23:23.130
  • We have no idea that if it's a cut flower,
  • 00:23:24.180 --> 00:23:26.190
  • it will continue to look beautiful for a season,
  • 00:23:27.250 --> 00:23:29.080
  • but ultimately it's lost the connection to the source of life and the fact of
  • 00:23:31.060 --> 00:23:34.190
  • the matter is that all of these ideas caring for the poor,
  • 00:23:36.000 --> 00:23:38.180
  • a loving your neighbor self, government,
  • 00:23:39.240 --> 00:23:41.090
  • and if you trace them backward, it's inevitable that faith comes into
  • 00:23:43.070 --> 00:23:46.090
  • play there. That's just the way it is.
  • 00:23:46.090 --> 00:23:47.290
  • There are people who in a way are gambling and saying,
  • 00:23:49.120 --> 00:23:50.260
  • well, we simply don't believe it.
  • 00:23:51.290 --> 00:23:52.070
  • We don't like it and we want to get rid of it.
  • 00:23:53.120 --> 00:23:53.280
  • I would even argue that not only is that wrong,
  • 00:23:55.040 --> 00:23:56.030
  • but it's in the United States. It's unconstitutional because the the
  • 00:23:57.240 --> 00:24:00.060
  • people who gave us the constitution gave us our form of government said it will
  • 00:24:00.060 --> 00:24:03.220
  • not work unless you allow people not just to think religious thoughts,
  • 00:24:05.200 --> 00:24:09.060
  • but to exercise their faith.
  • 00:24:10.020 --> 00:24:11.190
  • - Not saying the Christian West is perfect.
  • 00:24:13.160 --> 00:24:15.130
  • Far from It. We just had some apaulling moments -
  • 00:24:16.190 --> 00:24:20.120
  • some terrible slipups, but on balance,
  • 00:24:20.120 --> 00:24:22.000
  • what sort of society to most people in the world one of live in today,
  • 00:24:23.190 --> 00:24:24.280
  • it's the western capitalist democracies. They don't want to move there,
  • 00:24:26.240 --> 00:24:28.220
  • they want a model like that in their own homeland.
  • 00:24:28.220 --> 00:24:32.020
  • What an irony that you know, we live in an age when our own
  • 00:24:33.150 --> 00:24:37.060
  • academics, our own intellectuals,
  • 00:24:37.060 --> 00:24:39.210
  • our own intelligentsia - as those who dominate the debate in the public
  • 00:24:41.100 --> 00:24:44.230
  • square, want to rubbish and demolish,
  • 00:24:44.230 --> 00:24:46.090
  • introduce and encouraged us to self loathe own achievements. And that which we don't understand
  • 00:24:48.240 --> 00:24:51.280
  • - that which we pervert, that which we distort -
  • 00:24:54.050 --> 00:24:57.160
  • we're in danger of destroying.
  • 00:24:58.120 --> 00:25:01.000
  • Our children and our grandchildren will not thank us for it.
  • 00:25:01.000 --> 00:25:04.000
  • (Christian rock music)
  • 00:25:06.250 --> 00:25:11.250